CruiseControl

(11)
3.3 out of 5 stars

CruiseControl is both a continuous integration tool and an extensible framework for creating a custom continuous build process. It includes dozens of plugins for a variety of source controls, build technologies, and notifications schemes including email and instant messaging. A web interface provides details of the current and previous builds. And the standard CruiseControl distribution is augmented through a rich selection of 3rd Party Tools.

Work for CruiseControl?
Circleci 2x

Learning about CruiseControl?

We can help you find the solution that fits you best.

CruiseControl Reviews

Write a Review
Filter Reviews
Filter Reviews
  • Ratings
  • Company Size
  • User Role
  • User Industry
Ratings
Company Size
User Role
User Industry
Showing 12 CruiseControl reviews
LinkedIn Connections
CruiseControl review by <span>Erin H.</span>
Erin H.
Validated Reviewer
Verified Current User
Invitation from G2 Crowd
Reviewed On

Good for version management and push automation

What do you like best?

We use cruise control to automate builds to different internal (and production) environments. We associate different branches with different environments and then when you click a button to build, you will build from the associated branch. Pretty straightforward and anyone can do it from a user standpoint.

What do you dislike?

At least in our version, there's no confirmation window after you click to build. It'd be nice to confirm they were building to the right environment before executing the build.

Recommendations to others considering the product

This can be a pretty powerful tool if you use it right. Make sure you do your research.

What business problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?

We need to be working on multiple future releases at once without interfering with more current releases.

Sign in to G2 Crowd to see what your connections have to say about CruiseControl
Headshots
CruiseControl review by <span>Rafael A.</span>
Rafael A.
Validated Reviewer
Invitation from G2 Crowd
Reviewed On

A good and simple tool to start with your in-house CI adventure.

What do you like best?

I like the community support and all the add-ins/plugins that exist. I have used CC for a couple of years and I have not faced a situation where the community can't help or where there isn't a plugin to simplify the life.

What do you dislike?

I really dislike the use usage of XML to configure it. Sometime the config file can get really convoluted if you just add more and more projects in the same XML file. Even if there is a GUI tool and a schema checker I think that YAML or JSON would be a better tools for the job.

What business problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?

I have solved a Continuous Deployment scenario of multi-tenant projects using a master-slave CC configuration with a maximum of 5 nodes, from pulling de source code, running the testes and building the deployment packages and sending them to the specific servers that will run such a part of the system.

That configuration saved a lot of time and it was all in our VCS to make all the team responsible of the build.

What Continuous Integration solution do you use?

Thanks for letting us know!
CruiseControl review by <span>Janmejay S.</span>
Janmejay S.
Validated Reviewer
Invitation from G2 Crowd
Reviewed On

It is a simple tool built for teams looking for automated builds and CI.

What do you like best?

- Simplicity

- Small codebase

- Pioneer in the area of automated-builds and CI

- Very easy to get started with

What do you dislike?

- Lack of advanced features(multi-module builds, artifact management, jenkins like plugin ecosystem etc) and integrations

- Hasn't had a lot of steam in the last few years

Recommendations to others considering the product

Evaluate the complexity of usecase and choose between CruiseControl, Go (another product by Thoughtworks and Jenkins (a plugin-rich open-source offering) depending on usecase being limited to a team, entire-org involving complex build dependencies or would benefit from kind of build-tool, bug-tracker, VCS, artifact-management, release-management integration that Go and Jenkins provide. Jenkins has an edge in plugin-ecosystem, but Go wins in enterprise friendly and CI/CD friendly features.

What business problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?

Problem:

- CI for multiple projects, involving different languages, frameworks and build environments

Benefits:

- It ensures sane state of codebase with multiple checkins per day and large dev-teams

- It has fairly straightforward APIs, which allow build-bot, email, custom-electronic-component (led blinker etc) integration, which allows it to be used as shared dashboard at a floor level, rather than at a developer's desktop level

- Codebase if fairly approachable and making changes is easy for new users

-

CruiseControl review by <span>Taras K.</span>
Taras K.
Validated Reviewer
Invitation from G2 Crowd
Reviewed On

Easy to use continuous integration system

What do you like best?

If you are in need of some sort of continuous integration system, there are quite a few options. You might heard of Jenkins, or Travis. But setting them up requires a lot of knowledge, lot of tools and a separate machine (or few).

If you need a simple solution, that is easy to install and that will just work, CruiseControl is the way to go. It does not have all the bells and whistles of the big systems, but it makes the job done.

I've used it quite a few times, when a client wanted a simple easy to setup system.

What do you dislike?

It might be hard to configure and it might lack some features that the big systems provide, like Web interface.

Recommendations to others considering the product

Just try it. It's easier to set up then the big systems.

What business problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?

The tool is great for solving a problem when one needs a simple build system.

CruiseControl review by <span>Hector L.</span>
Hector L.
Validated Reviewer
Invitation from G2 Crowd
Reviewed On

Build Automation Tool

What do you like best?

At the time, I love the easy to setup and customize the tool. Including how I could use NAnt to automate my builds.

What do you dislike?

At the time it was hard to integrate with other platforms sucks as SharePoint, Project Server. Also the integration with visual studio ide was missing functionality. However I am sure that the new version is much better.

Recommendations to others considering the product

With all the Online automation systems like VSO and other, at this point it really hard for me to recommend CruiseControl to my clients since setting up a online visual studio account with a build server already and configure. Re-imaging or rebooting CruiseControl as an alternative will require either some really advance set of features/functionality like Mobile integration with productions like Teleriks Platform, Xamarin Tools Suites, XCode IDE integration and others.

Note: I used to love Cruise Control back in the days when MSBUILD suck and NAnt was king, however today the out of the box VSO system have solve my initial interest with Cruise Control. I hope this helps you guys out.

Cheers

What business problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?

Automate code compiling, code style review and generate release-able bits.

CruiseControl review by <span>Dominic B.</span>
Dominic B.
Validated Reviewer
Invitation from G2 Crowd
Reviewed On

CruiseControl.NET is a great product but not the simplest to use

What do you like best?

I have used CruiseControl.NET at two companies that I have worked for and found it be an extremely powerful CI tool. Being an open source tool there is a level of technical expertise assumed when you install and configure it. Although the installation process installs and sets up the CC.Net service, there is level of manual configuration required to configure permissions. If you are technically capable then this won't be a problem, but if you lack IT skills then you may find this problematic.

CC.NET gives you huge amounts of flexibility in setting up your CI projects. You can even configure CC.NET so that you can build CC.NET itself as just another CI project. Pretty cool.

To create new CI projects you will need to manually edit the underlying XML files. If you are technically competent then this won't be a problem.

You get a lot of bang for your buck withthe free version and I have never had to uswe the enterprise (paid) version. The free version can be used in heavy duty enterprise environments running multiple CI projects in large teams without any problem.

What do you dislike?

Although never a problem for myself, CC.NET does require a level of technical competency to configure, both during the installation stage and in adding your CI projects. The UI and ease of use could be improved, but the level of flexibility that you get more than makes up for this.

I would like to see a gated build added to CC.NET i.e. where broken builds are rejected. If you check in code that breaks the build then you need to take remedial steps to correct it. In other CI tools such broken builds are rejected before they get to that stage. The build is instead safely quarantined where it can be corrected before it breaks your build process.

Recommendations to others considering the product

Being an open source tool the support is in the form of the open source community. That said however I always found answers to my questions. The product is aa mature one with a large, healthy community and user base. It is well documented and supported by the community. It helps if you are technically competent as it's not the easiest application to install and configure. However, you get an impressively flexible and powerful CI tool that scales very well to the enterprise.

What business problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?

I have used CC.NET for WCF, Xamarin.Android and ASP.NET projects to name a few. I have also integrated CC.NET with Subversion version control. I used Nant build scripts to give greater flexibility to the build scripts that were used in conjunction with the CI projects.

You can use CC.NET fr both continuous integration as well as continuous deployment. I would recommend keeping your build CI projects separate form your deployment CI projects.

Kate avatar
Kate from G2 Crowd

Learning about CruiseControl?

I can help.
* We monitor all CruiseControl reviews to prevent fraudulent reviews and keep review quality high. We do not post reviews by company employees or direct competitors. Validated reviews require the user to submit a screenshot of the product containing their user ID, in order to verify a user is an actual user of the product.