QEMU

(15)
4.1 out of 5 stars

QEMU is a generic and open source machine emulator and virtualizer.

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QEMU review by Phil w.
Phil w.
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"Try Tizen on Qemu ARM"

What do you like best?

Qemu support various arch like ARM , It is useful for Tizen developers.

However, if you would like to hack on Tizen on ARM, you’re able to do this now with or without any ARM Hardware.

First install qemu-system-arm on your system (on debian family : sudo apt-get install qemu-system-arm ), then create or download armv7l disk image (tizen-common-wayland-arm-sunxi-20140527rzr.raw will also work). Since we wont boot on the image a kernel is needed just rebuild it or download it from upper link (vexpress has best support AFAIK)...

What do you dislike?

Unfortunately QEmu and 3D Hw acceleration is not yet supported, qemu-yagl might be an alternative to consider, Tizen project is using the later one as emulator. An UI that mimic virtualbox could be a good improvement for reaching more users and help migration of some of them.

Some vdi files can not be converted to qcow2 files? It would be also helpful to be able to split qcow2 files in smaller chucks and let QEmu merge them on the fly, similarly to vbox.

Recommendations to others considering the product

try to use it along virtmanager if you're looking for a GUI, but learning cli will help soon or later

What business problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?

As said earlier it was useful to deliver an ARM image of Tizen:Common , we used the verstatile profile, this same rootfs could be then adapted to other devices (ie: renesas, windriver etc).

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QEMU review by Le T.
Le T.
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"A great open source emulator"

What do you like best?

1. QEMU is good at device emulation and has various platforms which is perfect for development or testing on different platforms.

2. QEMU's documentation is quite helpful and it is easy to use with just few lines of command lines.

3. With KVM, QEMU is so efficient that you can even expect native experience from it.

4. As an open source software, its community is active and friendly. Thanks to engineers in QEMU community for introducing me to open source world.

What do you dislike?

I wonder if there are some GUI frontend for QEMU? It is a little hard for normal user to use with just command line. However, using Boxes in Fedora, it is handy to create and run a virtual machine. So maybe the community should introduce some helpful tools on the website.

Recommendations to others considering the product

QEMU is a good product for daily use or development. You can learn a lot from its implementation.

What business problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?

I am a student majoring in Virtualization. We have been doing some researches with QEMU and KVM. QEMU meets our needs perfectly.

What Remote Desktop solution do you use?

Thanks for letting us know!
QEMU review by 亚东 .
亚东 .
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"a generic and flexible machine emulator and virtualizer"

What do you like best?

QEMU is an emulator and virtualization machine that allows you to run a complete operating system as just another task on your desktop. It can be very useful for trying out different operating systems, testing software, and running applications that won't run on your desktop's native platform.

QEMU runs on x86 systems running Linux, Microsoft Windows, and some UNIX platforms, and can host target systems from a range of different microprocessors as detailed on the QEMU website.

QEMU has the advantage of being able to run either as a pure emulator or as a native virtual machine (on x86 / x86-64 hardware).

What do you dislike?

Need KVM to lifting speed.

Inadequate support for Microsoft Windows and some host operating systems (some analog of the system can only run).

Not perfect to support unusual architecture.

Difficult to install and use than other simulation software

Recommendations to others considering the product

good tool when no real device in hand. Better to use KVM or kqemu to help speed up.

What business problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?

Simulation of devices.

QEMU review by Dhruv V.
Dhruv V.
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"One of the best open source machine emulator"

What do you like best?

Qemu offers variety of architectures and platforms for emulation and it just works out of the box. One can run it on all major OSes ie, (windows, linux and Mac OS X) which makes it very popular irrespective of different OS users. One of key reason why it is one of the best emulation tool is that it achieves near native performance and it allows users to compare results without having to verify it on actual platform.

What do you dislike?

Being an open source software, it doesn't have fancy UI and most of the work / parameters are passed as a command line. It could be very confusing for the first time users, specially ones without having prior command line experience. I have struggled myself quite a bit when I was introduced to Qemu.

Recommendations to others considering the product

I would highly recommend Qemu to someone who is developing embedded systems / products and have to deal with various embedded platforms on a regular basis.

What business problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?

As a sr Embedded Engineer in an automation firm, I often deal with various embedded architectures and platforms for variety of our product. Qemu allows me to emulate almost every platform on which I work such as cubieboard, Rpi and various others and hence eliminate the need of actually purchasing kits to get familiar with the platforms. It saves us a lot of time and cost.

QEMU review by Derek R.
Derek R.
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"QEMU review - Great emulator for various systems and platforms"

What do you like best?

The thing about QEMU is that it has so many things to like!

First of all, it emulates pretty much any CPU you can think of. x86, ARM, PowerPC, and even some obscure RISC chips and custom chips. CPU emulation is stable for all platforms you can run QEMU on, and most systems run flawlessly.

Operating system support is fantastic as well, with Windows, Linux, and even Mac running fairly well. Other systems, like Unix and OS/2 and the like, run great as well. Especially considering that before QEMU you couldn't really run any of those systems well on Windows or Linux.

QEMU on Linux can run Windows at near native performance with VFIO, KVM, and a few other technologies switched on. If your CPU supports hardware virtualization, expect at least 95% of performance consistently.

QEMU can not only virtualize environments, but can also do things that make using QEMU easy for beginners, things like hard drive image creation and disc image creation. There are probably 1,000 reasons to use QEMU (like Xbox support with XQEMU), but for now I will just say it is probably the best system virtualization package available at the moment.

What do you dislike?

The only real complaints about QEMU that I can think of are all related to the Windows version.

First, there is no GUI that comes with QEMU on any system you run it on. This means if you want to simply emulate or virtualize something real quick to show a friend, or if you are a less tech savvy person, you may not have an easy time using this software.

Another issue is that KVM and VFIO don't have support on Windows. This slows down the Windows version considerably, and while you can still use most systems fine, Windows 10 or Mac OS X 10.10 will run fairly slow.

Speaking of Mac OS X, it has some problems as well. Running Mac OS X on any virtualization or emulation platform is difficult regardless, but due to the measurements Apple has taken to fight piracy, and lock it's operating system to just Mac owners, this makes it extremely difficult to run properly on QEMU. However, I would think QEMU and VirtualBox should both be able to run the operating system by now, since Mac OS has been standardized in terms of hardware and simplified in terms of software. Emulating hardware is difficult though, so I don't necessarily blame the developers so much as I blame the lack of effort on Apple to provide support for emulation and virtualization to their platform so that developers and testers can run tests quickly and make sure Apple support is finalized before the next release.

In addition, the GUI's that are available for QEMU are either outdated, don't allow use of all of QEMU's features, or are extremely difficult to look at or understand. This wouldn't be a problem with the original team normally, but I think QEMU really deserves a GUI. VirtualBox, VMware, Bochs, and PCem all have great GUI's. So I think a GUI in Qt or WxWidgets or something would really benefit this application.

Recommendations to others considering the product

I would consider whether or not your users will need to have a simple interface or not, and what operating system they will be running on the host machine. If they need a GUI that runs on Windows, you should probably go with something like VirtualBox, VMware, or something similar.

What business problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?

Quick testing of applications on multiple systems, web browser tests, quick operating system support tests, embedded system and open system testing, compiling for game consoles and Linux systems, support for Solaris and BSD, and so much more.

I know of more than a few business' that also use QEMU for hardware development, BIOS and firmware design, and electronic architectural projects.

QEMU review by George G.
George G.
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"Reliable, flexible and with great community support"

What do you like best?

I am using Qemu in Linux systems and I have to state that I am really satisfied by it's user-friendliness (talking only about Linux users, I have no feedback for other systems). Besides that I find Qemu very reliable and robust. Supporting many platform backends is also a big pro when it comes to embedded applications. Last but not least I find it's open-source nature very attractive both because I can hack some of it's code and create a custom solution for a problem and because of it's big community.

What do you dislike?

One downside of Qemu is it's performance in speed. Some more effort could be placed in this subject.

Recommendations to others considering the product

If you are an embedded developer incorporate it and stick with it! It might come with some effort to understand it's internals, but at the end it worth it. Try to create some tools around it (scripts, utilities) that will help you automate tasks like creating specific images, testing and other. Interact and trust the community, you will learn a lot and it comes very handy when you hit a dead-end.

What business problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?

Mostly I use Qemu in embedded applications. I can easily test software targeting for example ARM architecture. I can even automate testing easily and reliably. Moreover having custom hardware IP's and testing them alongside with an OS inside Qemu comes very handy. A good example is an IP meant to be used in smartphones. Having a virtual environment that runs Android using a custom IP is a great boost of productivity and cost beneficial.

QEMU review by Lukas S.
Lukas S.
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"It works, but it requires a bit of work too"

What do you like best?

Flexibility. This tool can do anything you may ever want to see in a virtualization environment.

Want to use a weird storage backend?

If it can't already use it, you can implement that yourself, no problem.

Want to use some pci(-e) devices inside the VM?

No problem.

What do you dislike?

In some environments it requires quite a lot of configuration to get the desired performance, especially Disk I/O can sometimes be quite hard to get just right.

Recommendations to others considering the product

If you want to get it working easily, or want to use it for local development, i'd recommend taking a look at libvirt and virt-manager as control interfaces for qemu, making it a lot easier to work with.

What business problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?

Virtualization of servers, at the moment mostly where Docker isn't an option (like running Windows inside the VM), or where Software needs quite a lot of privileges, which may be a security risk without "real" virtualization.

QEMU review by Scott H.
Scott H.
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"Easily modifiable for low level device simulation."

What do you like best?

We used Qemu to create a new device for the Microblaze architecture. A thorough read of the qemu source made hacking it a no brainer. We found the codebase very approachable, with plenty of examples ready to answer your questions. Really a great (and probably overkill) framework for our needs of simulating a low level device.

What do you dislike?

Starting/stopping qemu can be a pain, depending on your workflow.

Qemu's docs at times seemed non-exsistant. It is really up to the user to read the portion of the codebase they need, and hack small tests to explore new ideas.

Recommendations to others considering the product

Be ready to dive in. Don't expect the documentation to help!

What business problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?

Simulation of devices can be hard. Qemu really made it easy so we could move on to writing and validating our device drivers with ease.

QEMU review by José M V.
José M V.
Validated Reviewer
Review Source

"Virtualization made nice and easy"

What do you like best?

It's Open source, it's free. One configuration will emulate many CPUs. Development can improve the software over time as it's opensource. It is highly configurable, like really configurable.

What do you dislike?

It can be some times a pain to configure if you're new into the virtualization world, but there's a bunch of tutorials you can follow step by step on the internet and succeed. You can only virtualize using x86, x86_64, and PowerPC architectures. (Bye RPi)

Recommendations to others considering the product

If you're a ninja at setting things up and you have some spare time, feel free to take a look at this bad boy, it will give you some surprises as you set it up, get it up and running, you won't regret this choice.

What business problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?

Creating development enviroments can easily take some time of your days, QEMU can make it nice and clean in a few steps, i really encourage you to give it a shot.

QEMU review by Alessandro C.
Alessandro C.
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Verified Current User
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"Use qemu as a simple dev-ops virtualization software"

What do you like best?

Virtualize every you wants with just two lines of shell script. Start a virtual environment without memory consumption or particular hardware requirements.

What do you dislike?

A little bit more simple network configuration tool could be appreciated.

Recommendations to others considering the product

Is a simple and powerful tool, but is characterized with a bit harder learning curve.

What business problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?

As a software developer focused on linux software application development I use qemu to test applications on different linux distributions and windows, without particular hardware requirements, I could start a virtualized environment with just a couple lines of shell script.

QEMU review by User in Computer Software
User in Computer Software
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"Qemu - the swiss knife of OS developers"

What do you like best?

Apart from Qemu being one of the most power full virtualisation tool, used in a wide range of cloud computing providers, it can also be used to emulate a different architecutre (e.g. you can run arm64 binaries/linux on you x86 machine).

What do you dislike?

Difficult to set up the command line. The command line options differ significantly between different architectures (e.g. setting up a network interface is different in x86 and arm64)

What business problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?

I use it mainly for emulation of different architectures. For the development of new software for this architecture. If you are working on the OS level, it is really handy that you can dump easily the registers from your CPU to see what really happens.

QEMU review by Ramkumar R.
Ramkumar R.
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"Does the job minimally, but there are modern alternatives"

What do you like best?

It's open source. The interface is very transparent, and you can tweak whatever you like.

What do you dislike?

Doesn't work out of the box. Too many magic configuration options. I'm looking for a finished product, not the insides of an engine.

Recommendations to others considering the product

Use VMWare Fusion. For production, use Docker.

What business problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?

Didn't use it to solve business problems. Just played with it recreationally.

QEMU review by Zhizhou L.
Zhizhou L.
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Verified Current User
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"This is the only solution for simulation different CPU"

What do you like best?

Use different program from different CPU in the develop server which is X86.

What do you dislike?

If I meet a crash or error in the QEMU, it not easy to identify the problem, find the root cause and fix the bug.

What business problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?

Use to generate the rootfs for different platform

QEMU review by <span ue="safe-name" data-safe-name-id="62f61243-698b-4802-b12a-e7007c20e105">Zhang L.</span>
Zhang L.
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"Easy to simulator different cpu architecture"

What do you like best?

Qemu can simulator different cpu ( arm/x86/ppc/mips) winin linux/windows/mac os. And simulate in different level as system mode simulation and user mode simulation.

What do you dislike?

QEMU's interface is not very friendly to normal user.

What business problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?

Test application in different cpu architecture.

QEMU review by User in Information Technology and Services
User in Information Technology and Services
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Verified Current User
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"QEMU KVM for OpenStack"

What do you like best?

QEMU is an open-source software backed by some big names such as Google, IBM, RedHat and others. I enjoy it supports to execute on multiple processor architecture and operating systems.

What do you dislike?

QEMU is extensively used but the available documentation is scarce and outdated.

What business problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?

We use QEMU, with the Linux Kernel module, as the hypervisor for our OpenStack private cloud offerings. It helps us leverage the expertise and contributions of the QEMU community.

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