Redis

(74)
4.4 out of 5 stars

Redis is an open source, advanced key-value store. It is often referred to as a data structure server since keys can contain strings, hashes, lists , and sets.

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Showing 74 Redis reviews
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Redis review by <span>ammu P.</span>
ammu P.
Validated Reviewer
Review Source

"Review for redis"

What do you like best?

Redis is a open source ,Scalability ,Pub sub models,Luascript,key expire,key space notifications,Memory optimization,distributing of data among multiple redis instances

Memory optimization,key expires,creating secondary indexes with redis,Pipelining concepts in redis, No lack on tutorial for a lot of use cases, storing temporarily data

What do you dislike?

Unable to store high amount of data ,We should not able to observe logs(prints) while return code in luascript that return single time only so that we are difficult to find out errors,Insert into a LIST is O(1) complexity

Recommendations to others considering the product

I would like to recommend the redis database for data replication and can save data on disk and it is very fast.Debugging Lua scripts is very easy,We can optimize the memory usage.

If considering using Redis for a project, just try it, it's easy to use and feature-rich. The community is really active and there's no lack on tutorial for a lot of use cases

What business problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?

While doing project mongo db unable to handle parallel requests so that we go with redis.Redis having low latency time so better to go with redis database.

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Redis review by <span>Jonathan W.</span>
Jonathan W.
Validated Reviewer
Verified Current User
Review Source

"Great in-memory storage"

What do you like best?

What's best to appreciate about Redis is how quickly it's growing since it's first appearance and how useful and fast it is for many parts of a software implementation.

It always seemed to me like a storage option for caching or indexing, but it is way more than that. Some features are definitely to be highlighted like:

* Pub/Sub message system.

* Redis Cluster

* Expires

* Lua scripting

* Blazing fast

Are some of the things I noticed that make a difference when looking for this kind of memory storage.

What do you dislike?

I used to dislike the lack of features on Redis, but that was like 2 years ago, it has grown so quickly so fast that it's scary, the community is strongly focus on this product development.

Recommendations to others considering the product

If considering using Redis for a project, just try it, it's easy to use and feature-rich. The community is really active and there's no lack on tutorial for a lot of use cases.

What business problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?

Pretty much anything that needs to be stored and retrieved fast, like caching is a great use case for Redis. For example to store session information in web applications. Also to store large amounts of incremental and volatile data, since it can be "expired".

What Key-Value Stores solution do you use?

Thanks for letting us know!
Redis review by <span>Lee H.</span>
Lee H.
Validated Reviewer
Verified Current User
Review Source

"Redis as a stream of intent"

What do you like best?

Redis fits a sweet spot which is "out of band data store server". I work with a lot of CQRS/ES systems and in these systems it pays to have a persistent "out of process" view of typical data types such as hashes, lists, sets, etc.

It's fast, convenient, and the defaults make it a pleasure to use. Seeing how antirez maintains it makes it one of the go-to pieces of software that I instinctively trust based on years and years of astounding stability.

What do you dislike?

Redis has some sharp edges which only become apparent when you start to get off the beaten track. I recently suffered a few grey hairs because the algorithmic complexity of LRANGE is (S+N), where as the comment to insert into a LIST is O(1). The performance of LRANGE becomes problematic when taking the last few dozen items from the end of a very, very long list. Of course having huge lists is an anti-pattern, and it was easily solved by using the bindings Lua to implement a "fake" command which partitioned things into small lists, whilst taking care of pagination, etc.

Recommendations to others considering the product

Beware that Redis expects you to store data in the way you expect to *query* it. Take the time when designing your schema to imagine *how you want the data to look when you get it out*, and take care to store it that way.

In RDBMS you can query very flexibly to pull things out in any way you care to imagine, but you pay a penalty on inserts for this flexibility.

What business problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?

In our CQRS/ES system, the core concept is to pick the *ideal* store for reading, and writing. To embrace the asymmetry inherent in building systems to enjoy the freedom to pick the perfect data store for writing, reading, querying, etc depending on the exact use-case.

Redis' O(1) insert performance is idea. From there we have async processes that build idealised read-stores for certain types of data. Profiles are stored as JSON (on disk) ready to be delivered via our API with minimal involvement from the application servers. Things like contact lists, friendship groups and other "indexes" are also stored in redis as sets, hashes or lists. Redis solves all our data storage needs barring "static files" (for that we have a filesystem) and our "search" for which our clients usually expect something like ElasticSearch.

Redis review by <span>Vincent C.</span>
Vincent C.
Validated Reviewer
Review Source

"Perfect in-memory data structure storage with persistence"

What do you like best?

The Redis database is really easy to install and also easy to use. Configuration also fits into a single file.

Performances are very good and this tool allows you to scale your applications with ease.

The interesting thing with Redis when you develop web applications for instance is that you can use it for many purposes such as caching files, storing temporarily data, queueing, pub/sub system, and so many things.

Redis also allows you to choose fine-grained memory types to optimize your data storage.

One last thing, but not least, you can also write some custom Redis modules using the C language. This way, you can go further with your data storage and trigger Redis functions programmatically.

What do you dislike?

Honestly, nothing. This is a very good product at all levels.

The thing I can criticize is the security part: I actually have a token stored in the configuration file (clearly); which is not the best way to protect data.

Recommendations to others considering the product

I really recommend Redis for its simplicity and its robustness.

What business problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?

I use Redis for managing tokens that automatically expire after a defined time (3 days for instance) and also in order to manage application cache with keys.

I know that a new feature is also available now: Redis Stream in order to manage consumers for reactive applications but I haven't tested it yet.

Redis review by <span>Nico C.</span>
Nico C.
Validated Reviewer
Review Source

"Very quick server DataStore"

What do you like best?

Redis comes in a very light and fast environment which allowed me to run my test on an old Raspberry Pi without lags due to computation times.

What do you dislike?

There is a big lack of documentation both on official website that on online tutorial.

Moreover the event management is quite poor (but under active development).

This, in addition to the weird syntax, caused a little of problems in getting started with it.

Recommendations to others considering the product

If you are looking for a very fast datastore, Redis may be what you are looking for. Please be aware that it is so fast because it saves all (of most) of the storage directly on RAM, therefore it requires a server with a lot of primary memory in order to exploit it's full potential. This may lead to an increment of costs which should be considered.

Redis has a log file on disk with the history of all action performed which is used in case of recovery. By default this log is updated asyncronously at certain time intervals, this means that if a problem occours between two interval, it may lead to a data loss. It is configurable to update on log on each action, but this has to be bechmarked as may reduce performances.

What business problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?

I was working on a disaster-management mobile application and Redis was the datastore selected on server to manage the data because of it's impressive speed (which was a requirement in the development context).

Redis review by <span>Frank M.</span>
Frank M.
Validated Reviewer
Verified Current User
Review Source

"More than a database"

What do you like best?

Redis is easy to install, clean, nothing complex. The usage via CLI or drivers for programming languages - I wrote two for Google Go and Erlang/OTP - is simple too. But whats most fascinating is the fact, that it's not only a key/value store. The different types like hash, list, set, sorted set, hyper log log, and geo are great and useful. Also pub/sub and the internal Lua scripting help a lot. And last but not least is Redis extreme fast.

What do you dislike?

The transaction model is a bit different. Users have to understand it and care for it. Additionally there's no real security model, only a simple authentication via password. There's no multi-user model and no right control regarding types, keys, or key patterns. So this has to be done by the using application while the database is secure on an internal server.

The database does not work with queries on values. Keys can be queried, other indexes have to by created by using sorted sets. But that's not the typical usage of Redis, so no larger problem.

Recommendations to others considering the product

Simply try it together with the CLI and visit the web site http://redis.io to see the available commands. Most clients directly let you use these commands or provide them through own functions.

What business problems are you solving with the product? What benefits have you realized?

Mostly two types of use cases. One is the typical use as a cache, simply because it's fast and the automatic key expiration (if wanted) helps a lot. The other one is the temporary aggregation of statistical data using the different data types. For some smaller projects I'm also using it as a simple data store.

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